April 17, 2014

(Source: grapeton)

April 17, 2014
ncforientation2014:

OL Cassidy Roberts snapped this picture of one of the tiles in Palm Court

-Allya

ncforientation2014:

OL Cassidy Roberts snapped this picture of one of the tiles in Palm Court

-Allya

April 17, 2014

inside-notes:

Cook Hall & College Hall | New College of Florida

April 17, 2014
So it seems to be that time of the year…

where a ton of questions start flooding our inbox (I got over 10 today). Just a heads-up, I’m in the middle of finals and 10 days of events, so I will probably not be answering as promptly as usual! Or, I might answer promptly, but not as fully. 

Mostly what I’m saying is that I am Grumpy Cat right now

April 17, 2014

Anonymous asked: You mentioned how the work load can be very strenuous but that you couldn't imagine going anywhere else. In your opinion, what makes New College worth all of the extra work?

I just feel very at home there. That took a little bit (probably about half of a semester) and I don’t think I felt completely settled til second year, but feeling at home makes a huge difference. Even though I changed friend groups a few times, I still felt like I had a place to go. I also was shooting Ivy, so I expected a high workload. I actually didn’t think that classes at New would be difficult when I got here…yeah, I was wrong. I have a lot of friends at Ivy schools and I often find that I have just as much work — or more — than they do. The smallness of the school also can be helpful. You get to know the people who work here, the good study spots, the good make-out spots, who keeps ice cream in your fridge and doesn’t mind you crying in their room, when the Four Winds isn’t busy, the good spots in the library. But as a student community, New tries to offer a lot of different kinds of support for the stress. 

April 17, 2014

Anonymous asked: What would a week in a New College student's life look like?

Class pretty much every day (some people end up with Mondays or Wednesdays off, most commonly). A first-year student is most likely to take four classes. Once or twice a week there could be club meetings or extracurriculars. Friday and Saturday are days for relaxing; a lot of people will take Sunday to relax and do homework at the same time. If you have a job, you’ll have to work that out too.

It’s really hard to say the “average New College student” because there isn’t an average student schedule here. Thesis students tend to take one a couple of classes, but they’re also writing a thesis. Third years tend to be very stressed because for some reason workload seems to be really high here. Some people focus a lot on extracurriculars, others focus strictly on academics. Some have one job, some have many, some have none. 

April 17, 2014

Anonymous asked: Hi. I have been interested in NCF for a while, but I was wondering if the 'no grades' system would affect one's acceptance into medical school. Do you personally know of any students who were accepted into medical school, or of the acceptance rate?

I don’t know the acceptance rate, but I do know two people who just got into UM (Univ. of Miami)’s med program and got like $200k each to do so. I also know someone who got an interview at Oxford Medical. Not having grades doesn’t really harm that—just do well on your MCAT and make sure that you get the courses you need. You do need to make tutorials — like anatomy — because some things aren’t regularly offered courses. There’s a pre-med club to be a sort-of support group for people tracking for med school. Sarasota Memorial Hospital and the Health Department in Sarasota have also given internships to students. There are a handful of students every year who go on to medical school. 

April 17, 2014

Anonymous asked: How is getting around campus and to classes like?

I live off-campus, so I drive, though I would walk if I wanted to. I used to bike but then my bike broke, and I usually have a ton of stuff anyway. But getting around campus and to classes is fairly easy because it’s so small. When I lived on campus, I usually left my room 15 minutes before class so to get there a couple of minutes early. Some people bike to class, which is convenient if you have a class in College Hall or Caples (the farthest away parts of campus from the dorms), but you do “have to” go over a ramp thing that some people don’t like to do. If you’re someone who can easily walk, then campus is very walkable. 

April 17, 2014

Anonymous asked: Can you explain to me how the meal plans work, please? And what does "buying power" mean?

There actually isn’t a huge point to explaining our meal plans because we are in the middle of searching for our new provider, so meal plans will be changing. 

Currently, all first years buy the “first year/pei” meal plan which is the highest one you can get. Instead of being a “swipe to enter” system or a “one sweep unlimited eats” system, it works sort of like debit card. That’s what purchasing power means. Different items cost different amounts. Technically, you’re not supposed to spend more than $9/day (that’s what I was told as a first year anyway), though you can spend as much as you want. Living in other dorms, you pay less, because there is more cooking space. 

April 17, 2014

Anonymous asked: Hey, this is the wall anon. I just saw your post about them, so I'm good. Though if you feel like sharing more I'm always down for info.

Hi again

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